Without a Title.

stardust-rain:

stardust-rain:

sometimes tumblr’s US-centric social justice makes me so fucking frustrated. Right now sweden’s third biggest party are literally neo-nazis and our elections couldn’t even get onto trending tags today, goddamit.

Okay, so the post is gaining notes and…

The Black Prince of the Desert. Oh my.

The Black Prince of the Desert. Oh my.

fawnv:

Cranky little crab. 

This is adorable. The crab also looks like a butt at first glance.

fawnv:

Cranky little crab. 

This is adorable. The crab also looks like a butt at first glance.

"We need to recognize that for some people sex is great and for some sex is horrific and for some it’s on par with folding laundry."

deviantfemme:

dotterall:

(~Sex Isn’t Always Good by queenieofaces)

This is a critical part of sex positivity that tends to be overlooked. Let’s celebrate empowering amazing sex and the choice to not have sex, or only have certain kinds of sex. 

This is as vital as revising our current definition of virginity. It’s not something one has, in the sense that they’re somehow lesser after having ‘lost’ it, however one could have done so. Sex comes in many types, and the only word that seems adequate to explain experience in sex is, well, experience.

Virginity is a human construction—and nothing more.

fredericstewart:

Korra Book 3 finale is online right now!   These are some backgrounds from this season and some comps from the finale.

exhibition-ism:

Street artist Pejac transforms concrete walls into imaginative canvases 

exhibition-ism:

Street artist Pejac transforms concrete walls into imaginative canvases 

^_^

Every year, I try to do at least two things with my students at least once. First, I make a point of addressing them as “philosophers” – a bit cheesy, but hopefully it encourages active learning.

Secondly, I say something like this: “I’m sure you’ve heard the expression ‘everyone is entitled to their opinion.’ Perhaps you’ve even said it yourself, maybe to head off an argument or bring one to a close. Well, as soon as you walk into this room, it’s no longer true. You are not entitled to your opinion. You are only entitled to what you can argue for.”

A bit harsh? Perhaps, but philosophy teachers owe it to our students to teach them how to construct and defend an argument – and to recognize when a belief has become indefensible.

The problem with “I’m entitled to my opinion” is that, all too often, it’s used to shelter beliefs that should have been abandoned. It becomes shorthand for “I can say or think whatever I like” – and by extension, continuing to argue is somehow disrespectful. And this attitude feeds, I suggest, into the false equivalence between experts and non-experts that is an increasingly pernicious feature of our public discourse.

No, you’re not entitled to your opinion (via kiransingh)

Opinion as in defended argument is what we’re entitled to—circular logic is not necessarily wrong or incoherent, but it is most commonly both irrefutable and indefensible without cutting out a portion of the circle. In the end, one can only defend beliefs with similar beliefs, all the while failing to provide an actual argument for said beliefs; once an argument can be made and defended (the ‘and defended’ bit is quite important), then one can be sanguine in their holding and usage of said argument. I would call that opinion.

imhonestlybeyonce:

askulloffoxes:

fightingforanimals:

The woman on the left is a mother from Miami who was so desperate to feed her hungry family that she was trying to steal a lot of food.
The woman on the right is Miami-Dade County Police Officer Vicki Thomas. Officer Thomas was about to arrest Jessica Robles but changed her mind at the last minute.

Instead of arresting her, she bought Robles $100 worth of groceries:
“I made the decision to buy her some groceries because arresting her wasn’t going to solve the problem with her children being hungry.”
And there’s no denying they were hungry. Robles’ 12 year old daughter started crying when she told local TV station WSVN about how dire their situation was:
“[It’s] not fun to see my brother in the dirt hungry, asking for food, and we have to tell him, ‘There is nothing here.’”
Officer Thomas says she has no question that what she did was right:
“To see them go through the bags when we brought them in, it was like Christmas. That $100 to me was worth it.”
But Officer Thomas did have one request:
“The only thing I asked of her is, when she gets on her feet, that she help someone else out. And she said she would.”
And guess what? The story gets even better.
After word got out about what happened people donated another $700 for Jessica Robles to spend at the grocery store.
And then best of all a local business owner invited her in for an interview and ended up hiring her on the spot as a customer service rep.
She started crying when he told her:
“There’s no words how grateful I am that you took your time and helped somebody out. Especially somebody like me.”
And to think it all started with one veteran police officer trusting her “instinct” instead of going “by the book”.
Source


I N S T I N C T

THIS

Always. Always guts.

imhonestlybeyonce:

askulloffoxes:

fightingforanimals:

The woman on the left is a mother from Miami who was so desperate to feed her hungry family that she was trying to steal a lot of food.

The woman on the right is Miami-Dade County Police Officer Vicki Thomas. Officer Thomas was about to arrest Jessica Robles but changed her mind at the last minute.

Instead of arresting her, she bought Robles $100 worth of groceries:

“I made the decision to buy her some groceries because arresting her wasn’t going to solve the problem with her children being hungry.”

And there’s no denying they were hungry. Robles’ 12 year old daughter started crying when she told local TV station WSVN about how dire their situation was:

“[It’s] not fun to see my brother in the dirt hungry, asking for food, and we have to tell him, ‘There is nothing here.’”

Officer Thomas says she has no question that what she did was right:

“To see them go through the bags when we brought them in, it was like Christmas. That $100 to me was worth it.”

But Officer Thomas did have one request:

“The only thing I asked of her is, when she gets on her feet, that she help someone else out. And she said she would.”

And guess what? The story gets even better.

After word got out about what happened people donated another $700 for Jessica Robles to spend at the grocery store.

And then best of all a local business owner invited her in for an interview and ended up hiring her on the spot as a customer service rep.

She started crying when he told her:

“There’s no words how grateful I am that you took your time and helped somebody out. Especially somebody like me.”

And to think it all started with one veteran police officer trusting her “instinct” instead of going “by the book”.

Source

I N S T I N C T

THIS

Always. Always guts.